Tag Archive: South Carolina


Missouri pro-child labor State Senator Jane Cunningham (R-Chesterfield) (Missouri Legislature)

There is news to report on the Missouri proposal to allow children under the age of 14 to work up to 80 hours per week and to specifically allow them to work after hours in hotels and motels: The bill is now dead. It turns out that the measure received poor publicity for some reason – perhaps it was the part that would have prevented the state from investigating the working conditions of the children.

In other news, South Carolina Tea Party Governor Nicky Haley has had a bad week. People are now catching on that the Tea Party intends to privatize all public entities, and that privatization will only mean further disenfranchisement for normal people. Things are no different in South Carolina, where Nicky Haley is planning to attack pensions and benefits for state workers just like everywhere else that happens to have Tea Party governors.

Haley also planned to grade legislators – a bald attempt to pressure legislators to agree with her.

One thing that she is doing well is that she is promoting a bill that would require greater financial transparency for office holders. According to The State, the law would require:

Requiring more financial disclosure from lawmakers. Haley is backing a Senate bill that would require lawmakers — and her —to disclose to the State Ethics Commission any gifts or services that they get from companies that have contracts with the state and from groups that lobby lawmakers. The bill also would require lawmakers to disclose any contractual work they have done for companies that employ appointed members of state boards or commissions.

But there is a problem. The State also reports:

Haley’s tax returns, released during last year’s campaign, show she earned nearly $43,000 between 2007 and 2009 from a never-before-then-disclosed contractual job with Midlands engineering company, Wilbur Smith. Both the company, which has done work for the state, and Haley declined to say what she did to earn that money.

Another scandal swirling in South Carolina occurred when she removed the largest donor in the history of the University of South Carolina from its Board of Trustees. She replaced her with Tommy Cofield, a major donor to her personal gubernatorial campaign.

The Governor of South Carolina is now also taking heat for lying on a job application to earn more pay. Read more on that here. This all begs the question – why are people allowing crooks to run for office? It is not as if the Lieutenant Governor is any better – Ken Ard has just been charged with 92 ethics violations… something about using campaign funds for personal expenses or something illegal like that. Good grief!

But the Tea Party Moral Compass Award for the past week has to go to Kansas State Representative Virgil Peck (R-Tyro), who during a committee meeting that discussed culling the state’s wild pig population by shooting them from helicopters said that the same plan would be a good way to control illegal immigration. He said that he was joking, but judge for yourself on the sound clip at this link.

Welcome to the wonderful world of compassionate conservatism.

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If you can read this sign, thank a teacher. (mjs538 at Buzzfeed)

An article in the Madison Capitol Times explains that there is a bit of controversy as competing groups utilize various facts and figures to support their cause regarding the benefits of unions on students. The Republicans such as State Senator Glenn Grothman argue that Wisconsin’s state 4th-grade reading scores are below the national average and that this is the result of strengthening unions over the past ten years. But this belies the fact that the state is actually above average in nearly all other standardized tests.

The Unions claim that Wisconsin is number 2 in SAT/ACT scores. First, that is an older result and now the number is more like #3 on SAT scores, but with only 4% representation. This is not a great statistic, because it selects only the very top students in a state where ACT scores are taken and compares their scores with the wider sample of students in states (including average ones) that accept the SAT exam.

An article in the Harvard Educational Review did find that students in pro-union states do a statistically significant 50 points better on the SAT. The problem still remains that we are comparing the best and the brightest between states and those students often do well even with poor teaching. We rather need some assessment that more fully describes the full distribution of students, including average and poor students.

It is here that Angus Johnson, a historian of student activism makes some very good arguments. Wisconsin is actually above average on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) exams in eight grade math and reading and fourth grade math. One reason for a lower score in reading is the large influx on non-english speaking students Wisconsin has received during the past ten years, and another would be state budget cuts to education during that period as well.

Mr. Johnson continues by comparing Wisconsin results with non-union teaching states such as Virginia, Arizona, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Mississippi. These are by and large not states known for excellent education and Johnson’s statistics confirm this:

Of the ten states in the US without teachers’ unions, only one — Virginia — had NAEP results above the national average, and four — Arizona, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi — were in the bottom quintile.

That is right, of the 10 states without unionized teachers, 4 of those states rank in the bottom 10 states, 9 of 10 non-union states are in the bottom 25, and only one state, Virginia, ranks in the top 25 states in the nation regarding education – well behind Wisconsin.

This makes perfect sense. Using the Tea Party’s own market-based principles, it seems reasonable to assume that talented teachers would gravitate toward states with higher, union-supported salaries. One would think that a market-based Tea Party Governor, interested in the quality of education in his state might recognize this point. One would also think that Governor Walker would understand that the state’s most vital resource is education.

Wisconsin can not afford the brain-drain that occurs in states like Iowa. People stay in Wisconsin because of the quality of education and standards of living that are in part supported by unionized teachers. Sadly, Governor Walker does not seem to agree. So that leaves the rest of the state to make a choice: Squander one of your state’s most competitive assets, or relegate your standard of living to that of Mississippi.