Newsboys selling newspapers on the Brooklyn Bridge, 1908 (Lewis W. Hine, via Wikipedia)

In 1898, in an attempt to boost earnings from the increase in sales brought on by the onset of the Spanish American War, newspaper publishers raised the price of a bundle of newspapers 20%, from 50¢ to 60¢. While it does not seem like a very steep price today, the price increase made it very difficult for newsboys to purchase bundles for distribution because many of the boys who sold newspapers were poor and sometimes homeless. Wages were already low and most newsboys earned only about 30¢ per day.

Because the price increase made it difficult for newsboys to earn a living, they went on strike. This was the Newsboy Strike of 1899. They refused to sell newspapers owned by Joseph Pullitzer and William Randolph Hearst. The strike had immediate effect as Pullitzer’s New York World newspaper circulation dropped by two-thirds. After two weeks, the newspapers began distributing their papers at 50¢ per bundle once again.

Do not feel too sorry for William Randolph Hearst. He actually helped to start the Spanish American War. See how in tomorrow’s Pseudo-random Wiki-link.

Wikipedia: Newsboy Strike of 1899

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