Minnesota State Capitol (rbw)

Women’s Labor Rights

While the state of Minnesota has not made the same national headlines as its neighbor Wisconsin, the 2010 election had a major impact there as well. The political situation would be identical to the conditions in Wisconsin and Michigan were it not for the election of Democratic Governor Mark Dayton. During the last term, the State Senate had a Democratic supermajority + one, while the State House had a Democratic supermajority – one. The tables have now turned as both houses hold modest Republican majorities.

Other than their majorities, there is little modest about the group. There have already been clear indications that the Republicans are intensely ideological with the debate over the state budget now well under way.

The extremism has been broadly-based. Senator john Carlson (R-Bemidji) was forced to apologize for his attempt to repeal equal pay for women. Now, one may consider that a fluke occurrence, but just read his glib response to his pulling of the bill from the rolls (courtesy of the Bemidji Pioneer, via the Minnesota Independent):

“That bill’s been pulled and it won’t see the light of day. I would admit I didn’t do my homework very well.

“So I author the bill, put it in the hopper, and the next thing I know, all hell breaks loose and I deserve it for being naïve. Quite honestly, I deserve that. I did it with good intentions.

“Obviously, I’ve been married for 32 years, I have a daughter out in the workforce, and I have a granddaughter — I can’t believe anyone would think I would harm that relationship.”

Indeed. How could one have the foresight to realize that telling one’s wife and daughter that they do not deserve equal pay simply because they are female would endanger those relationships?

One might argue that it was all a simple mistake – that it was one Senator who made a bad decision. Unfortunately, that is not the case: This was at least the fifth attempt to do so in the state legislature. The original form of the bill was authored by Rep. Steve Drazkowski (R-Mazeppa) and it ranged further, with additional restrictions on part-time police officers and cuts to library funding.

The Republicans are gunning for the 1984 Pay Equity Act for local government jobs. Each of the attempts are being supported by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce. In a December 2010 statement on Fiscal Policy they state:

    Pay Equity/Comparable Worth:

The Legislature should repeal the state’s pay equity/comparable worth law. It is outdated and hampers a government entity’s ability to manage the workforce. It is also an unfunded mandate to local governments.

There you go – equal pay for women is now “outdated” as our future begins to look a lot like the past. The Chamber of Commerce statement on women has been revised since December. A February 1st post by Politics Daily quotes the same source in the following way:

“The state’s pay equity/comparable worth law should be repealed. Its purpose is outdated, and requiring governments to correct perceived ‘errors’ in labor markets based on bureaucratic and subjective assessments of the relative value of government jobs is an
unnecessary and costly mandate.”

The current economic crisis has hit men very hard. Women now comprise a slight majority of the workforce. One can see the cynical thinking: Rather than increase the salaries for struggling men, Republicans seek to cut pay for women. Such a move would only make life more difficult for families that are already facing financial crisis.

Worker’s Rights

Minnesota residents can expect more action on labor issues as time goes on. Here is what the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce says about outsourcing and arbitration:

    Competitive Sourcing:

The Legislature should remove any restrictions to competitively sourcing services. This does not mean that the state or local governments should outsource all services. Instead, the Chamber supports having public employees compete with the private sector for the provision of services.

    Arbitration Considerations:

The Legislature should require labor arbitrators to consider the total compensation and prevailing benefit levels offered in the private sector. This should help make sure that future compensation and benefit decisions do not become out of line with private-sector counterparts.

One can see there in essence the same provisions that Governor Walker has passed through t he legislature in Wisconsin. The difference in Minnesota is that thanks to a narrow voting margin, that state has a Democratic Governor who is likely to veto any such measure.

Reproductive Rights

A total of four bills have been introduced to ban state funding for abortion. Some contain wording that state that if one portion of the law is repealed by a court, the rest should stand. Such wording is intended to reverse court decisions of the past 40 years that have ensured reproductive rights for women.

Republicans added more fuel to the fire by challenging the Roe vs. Wade decision with three bills to ban abortions that take place after 20 weeks of pregnancy – regardless of consideration of medical conditions that could injure the mother.

In response to this flurry of anti-reproductive rights action, the Democrats introduced a bill, HF646, that guarantees that all people have a right to use or refuse birth control and abortions, containing the same severability language that protects the remainder of the bill if one part of it is overturned.

Stay tuned, there is a lot more to report on the Minnesota legislature as it continues to work against 20th century progress. Luckily, there is a Governor in Minnesota who can prevent these laws from taking effect.

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