Works Progress Administration (vis Wikipedia)

During the deepest depths of the Great Depression, President Roosevelt created the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the largest federal agency as part of the New Deal. In its beginnings in 1935, the WPA cost $1.4 billion, growing in size to $11 billion by 1943 (this is equivalent to expenditures of $25.6 billion and $136 billion per year in 2009 dollars). This mammoth undertaking employed 8 million people to construct and revitalize the national infrastructure. WPA construction projects, like CCC projects are everywhere – nearly every city in the country has at least one. The workers in the WPA built bridges, libraries, roads, dams, power plants, post offices, parks, schools, and shelters. Many of these projects are still around and in use today. A large people were also employed to distribute food to the needy, there were education programs, and there was a good deal of investment in the arts, media and community theater. By 1943, the unemployment rate had shrunk to very low levels due to the high demand for labor to build arms and munitions for World War II and the WPA closed its doors after building public infrastructure that later fueled the economic boom of the 1950s and 1960s.

Wikipedia: Works Progress Administration

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