Shortly after taking over, the Egyptian offers its assurances to the world and to its neighbors that it will ensure a transition to democracy and that it will uphold its peace treaty with Israel. Continuing protests across the region have rulers offering a variety of concessions in order to appease the masses, all while a new, more democratic pan-Arabism is beginning to take hold among the people who are looking at their own situations with less focus on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and Iraq as a result. In Iran, a Facebook page organizing protests against the government already has over 48,000 friends as of early Sunday. Despite promises of a crackdown, this may result in the largest wave of protests in Iran since the “Green Wave” after the 2009 presidential election.

There are other consequences of the protests, however. The Italian island of Lampedusa has seen an influx of nearly 4,000 refugees, mostly from nearby Tunisia after 4 weeks of protests toppled the government there. And despite an early reaction by citizens and the military to prevent looting, the Egyptian Museum is missing 17 artifacts and jewelry stolen from the gift shop.

In the U.S., more news of austerity rears its head as President Obama proposes his third federal budget. The cuts are not expected to be as deep as the competing Republican proposal, though progressive groups are upset as the poor are likely to bear the brunt once again – even in Obama’s proposals – at a time they need it the most. In addition, education will become more expensive once again as Obama’s proposal cuts Pell Grants to the tune of $100 billion over 10 years (the equivalent of a cut of $10,000 for 1 million students during that time). These cuts are likely to impact poor and middle class students the most, considering the historical rate of increase in college tuition. Meanwhile, House Speaker Boehner urges Obama to agree to immediate budget cuts in a show of posturing immediately before the already-planned release of the White House budget proposal. Yet the Republican proposal has virtually no cuts to defense or corporate subsidies, such as $4 billion in subsidies to petrochemical companies who have done quite well recently.

The Tea Party has ushered a new era of austerity in state budgets as well. Newly elected Governor Walker of Wisconsin, fresh from eliminating the clear and present danger of business associated with high-speed rail traffic through his state between Chicago and Minneapolis-St. Paul, has ordered a sudden 17% pay cut to state workers and plans to strip collective-bargaining rights from state employee unions. In a move that smells of political payback, Governor Walker has suggested that he will respond to the likely worker strikes by mobilizing the Wisconsin National Guard in a move similar to that we have seen on TV in Egypt during the early days of the protests.

With the upcoming release of incriminating documents by WikiLeaks, Bank of America has apparently hired a computer security group to look for ways to destroy WikiLeaks. Unfortunately for Bank of America, some of those discussions – have been leaked. A number of the proposed techniques are illegal. After Friday’s final day of extradition hearings, for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, a British magistrate may deliberate the evidence for several weeks, though Assange remains on bail for the time being.

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